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Covington Named to NLJ’s Appellate Hot List

June 19, 2012

WASHINGTON, DC, June 19, 2012 — For the fourth time, The National Law Journal has named Covington & Burling to its “Appellate Hot List.” The 2012 list recognizes firms whose appellate track records over the past year have included significant victories in cases that affect the course of industries, vindicate important constitutional rights, and have high financial stakes.

Covington’s profile cited the U.S. Supreme Court’s appointment of partner Robert Long to present oral argument as an amicus curiae in U.S. Department of Health and Human Services v. Florida, one of the challenges to the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. Robert Long, chair of Covington’s appellate practice, has argued 17 cases before the high court.

The NLJ also highlighted Covington’s work in Brady v. National Football League, in which the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit ruled in favor of the National Football League and rejected the players’ attempt to secure an antitrust injunction in the midst of the parties’ labor dispute. Litigation partner Gregg Levy led the Covington team representing the NFL. Mr. Levy described the appellate ruling as a critical moment in the collective-bargaining negotiations.

Also noted in the NLJ profile is Covington partner Alan Vinegrad’s victory before the Second Circuit in overturning the conviction of, and securing a new trial for, Robert Graham, former senior vice president of General Re Corp.

The list and profiles of the winning firms appear in the NLJ’s June 18 issue.

Covington’s highly regarded appellate practice, spanning offices across the country, includes former federal judges, former assistants to the Solicitor General, and numerous former federal appellate and U.S. Supreme Court law clerks.

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