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Leading IP Litigator Roderick McKelvie Joins Covington

January 4, 2005

WASHINGTON, D.C., January 4, 2005 -  Covington & Burling announced today that  Roderick R. McKelvie, a former federal district court judge whose litigation practice focuses on patent and other intellectual property matters, has joined the firm as a partner. Judge McKelvie will be resident in the firm's Washington, D.C. office.

From 1992 to 2002, Judge McKelvie served on the United States District Court for the District of Delaware, then and now an important venue for major patent litigation.  During his time on the bench, Judge McKelvie presided over dozens of patent trials and developed a widely recognized expertise in that field.  Prior to his judicial service, Judge McKelvie was a highly regarded commercial trial lawyer in Wilmington.  Most recently, Judge McKelvie was a partner at Fish & Neave LLP. 

Stuart Stock, chair of Covington's management committee, said: "We are extremely pleased to have a lawyer of Judge McKelvie's stature and experience join us.  In recent years, we have made considerable strides in developing our patent and other IP litigation practice, and we see Judge McKelvie playing a central role in our continuing growth of that practice."

"From my work as a judge, I know that Covington is a great firm, populated with exceptional lawyers," said Judge McKelvie.  "The firm is strongly committed to growing its patent and IP litigation practice and I am very excited to have the opportunity to be a part of that effort. "

Judge McKelvie received his B.A. from Harvard in 1968 and his J.D. from the University of Pennsylvania in 1973.  He has published and presented extensively on various litigation and intellectual property topics.  He also serves as Vice Chair of the National Academies' Committee on Intellectual Property Rights in Genomic and Protein Research and Innovation.

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